Philosophy of educationIn an ideal world, I really believe that the majority of people who are involved in education, whether they’re a teacher, administrator, coach, counselor, are anything else, would have a genuine care for kids. During the socialization process of teaching children how to exist in a particular culture, the system of education serves to provide the psychological structures for social homogenization by imparting the “wisdom of the ages,” knowledge handed down from previous generations and that is deemed that everyone should know.

John Ruskin, a Nineteenth Century English social critic, said, “Education does not mean teaching people to know what they do not know; it means teaching them to behave as they do not behave.” A good education teaches you how to use your ability to think so that you can behave in the ways that emanate from your uniqueness as a person and that consequently lead to your being a success as that person.Philosophy of education

Meander, a Fourth Century BC Greek philosopher, said that the basis of civilization was for citizens to “know themselves,” and that this meant, “to get acquainted with what you know and what you can do.” He assumes that all human beings have within them, by virtue of their being alive, knowledge born of their unique manifestation of life.

John Dewey, one of the most prominent educational philosophers, in his book ‘Democracy and Education’, even devoted an entire chapter on teacher education philosophy and talks about various aspects that play a formative role in the education of children.

The underlying philosophy of this learning method is that the best way to learn is to “learn by doing.” In this method, the experiential and empirical approach to learning is given more premium than the teacher-centered model wherein all concepts and learning opportunities emanate from the actions initiated by the teacher.

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